Release your everyday from gout

IF YOU HAVE MORE THAN ONE FLARE A YEAR, IT MAY BE TIME TO STEP UP YOUR GOUT TREATMENT

Recurrent gout flares may be your body’s way of telling you that oral medicines aren’t doing enough to lower your uric acid level and prevent the harmful effects of out-of-control chronic gout. KRYSTEXXA (kris-TEX-uh) KRYSTEXXA support icon
has been helping gout patients for more than 10 years. Studies show that one IV treatment every other week for about 6 months is all you may need to take control.

ROBERT’S KRYSTEXXA STORY: 

AN INTERACTIVE JOURNEY

  • Learn about the signs and symptoms of out-of-control gout
  • See what causes gout to become out of control
  • Visit with a gout specialist and a KRYSTEXXA Patient Access Liaison

Robert is not an actual patient.

Read transcript

ROBERT’S GOUT ATTACK

Robert:

(Moaning) “Oh, not again.”

Barbara:

“I’ll get your pills.”

 

SEE WHAT ROBERT MISSES OUT ON

Barbara:

 “Hi sweetie.”

Julie:

“Mom, what’s wrong?”

Barbara:

“Dad can’t make it today. He had another gout attack.”

Julie:

“Again? Josh is going to be crushed. I wish there was something I could do.”

Barbara:

“Me too.”

Barbara:

“Can I get you anything?”

Robert:

“Less gout pain.”

 

SEE WHAT BARBARA WAS DREAMING ABOUT

Josh:

“Awesome!”

Robert:

(Moaning) “Not again.”


UNDERSTAND GOUT JOINT AND BONE DAMAGE

Narrator:

“Gout is a form of arthritis that’s caused by uric acid buildup. People with gout have trouble getting rid of uric acid, so it starts to form crystals that accumulate in the joints and cause painful flareups. As more uric acid crystals build up, gout can get worse. You may experience more frequent flares, your flares may last longer and you may feel pain in more joints. Uric acid can also build up in vital organs like the heart and kidneys. If oral medicine doesn’t work well enough, gout may become out of control and lead to permanent joint and bone damage. You could also develop lumps around joints throughout the body that make everyday activities a challenge. It may be difficult to put on shoes, bend down, or even wear a wedding ring. That’s why it’s important to take control of gout.”

 

HEAR ROBERT OPEN UP ABOUT OUT-OF-CONTROL GOUT

Robert:

“It got to the point where I was getting an attack every month. Even when I wasn’t, I was thinking about it. It takes over.”

Barbara:

“Every time he has an attack, it’s another week out of his life. Our life.”

Robert:

“It’s hard to work and exercise. I’m afraid of doing anything that might trigger an attack.”

Barbara:

“As his gout got worse and he started to have more attacks, he avoided making plans for fear of disappointing people. The lumps on his hands really bothered him.”

Robert:

“Even though I have people who support me, it’s my body and my pain. It’s hard to understand how gout can be so debilitating,”

Barbara:

“It hurts me to see him in pain.” 

Robert:

“The hardest part is not being there for my family. If I had a dime for everything I’ve had to miss.”

Barbara:

“You’d spend it all on birthday presents.”

 

LEARN HOW ROBERT TAKES CONTROL OF GOUT

Robert:

“How’s it looking?”

Specialist:

“Your uric acid level is still well over 6 milligrams per deciliter. That’s higher than it should be and why you’re continuing to experience symptoms. Since the oral medications aren’t doing enough, I’d like to tell you about a treatment option called KRYSTEXXA. KRYSTEXXA is an IV treatment that works differently to lower your uric acid level and help prevent uric acid crystals from building up and causing permanent joint and bone damage. It could also get rid of the buildup that’s accumulated over the years that’s causing your symptoms.”

Robert:

“Does it have side effects?”

Specialist:

“Some people experience allergic reactions. These reactions can be life threatening and usually happen within 2 hours of the infusion. We can reduce that risk with medication that I’ll prescribe before your treatment. The most common side effect in clinical trials was something called mobilization flares.”

Robert:

“What’s that?”

Specialist:

“Mobilization flares are gout flares that happen when uric acid crystals start to mobilize, or loosen, from your joints. They can be a sign your treatment is working.”

Robert:

“Good to know.”

Specialist:

“Before you start KRYSTEXXA, we’ll test you for a rare blood disorder called G6PD deficiency, or favism, that would prevent you from taking KRYSTEXXA.”
Robert:

How long does KRYSTEXXA take to work?”

Specialist:

“KRYSTEXXA is taken every two weeks for about 6 months and can start dissolving years of gout buildup within 24 hours of the first treatment.”

Robert:

“I only have to take it for 6 months?”

Specialist:

“Yes. When your treatments end, I’ll continue monitoring you to help keep your gout under control.”

Robert: “I like the way that sounds.”

 

VISIT AN IV TREATMENT CENTER

Receptionist:

“Hello.”

Robert:

“Hi, I have an appointment.”

Nurse:

“How are you today?”

Robert:

“A little anxious, but excited to get this show on the road.”

Nurse:

“It’s okay to be nervous. Don’t worry, you’re in good hands. This is an IV pole and this is your treatment. I’m going to place a small needle in your arm. Your treatment will take about two hours. Just relax and let me know if you need anything. You’ll be monitored the whole time for potential side effects from the infusion.”

Robert:

“What could happen?”

Nurse:

“It’s possible to become nauseous or develop a bruise, for example. Severe allergic reactions are very rare and can be resolved by stopping or slowing your treatment and taking common medications like Benadryl®

Robert:

“Got it. Thanks for explaining.”

Nurse:

“Of course. Would you like something to read?” 

Robert:

“No thanks, I’ve come prepared.”

Nurse:

“I’ll be back a couple times to check on you. You’ll be done before you know it. Okay, Robert, your treatment is done.”

Robert:

(Gesturing with book) “Just when it was getting good.”

Nurse:

“I’m just going to monitor you a little longer for potential side effects before you go home.”

Robert:

“Okay, thank you.”

Nurse:

“You’re ready to go home. You did great. I’ll see you in two weeks.”

Robert:

“You certainly will.”

 

LISTEN TO ROBERT’S PEER MENTOR STORY

Julie:

“I’m so glad you’re feeling better dad.”

Robert:

“I’m sorry I couldn’t make Josh’s party.”

Julie:

“He loves his new bike!”

Robert:

“I wish I could have seen the look on his face. Did mom tell you I’m starting a new treatment? It’s called KRYSTEXXA.”

Julie:
“She did. You think it will help?”

Robert:

“I just talked to somebody who finished KRYSTEXXA. He told me about the other medications he’s tried and how often he was still getting gout attacks. Can you believe he had a gout attack the night before his daughter’s wedding? I know how that feels.”

Robert:

“He also told me what it was like to get KRYSTEXXA infusions. It felt good to talk to someone who knows what I’m going through and was able to share his treatment experience.”

Julie:

“See dad, you’re not alone. Here they are!”

Josh:

“Grandpa!”

 

6 MONTHS AFTER KRYSTEXXA

Robert:

“Since KRYSTEXXA, my gout is in control and the lumps on my hands are better, too.”

Julie:

“Dad looks great.”

Barbara:

“He really does. He’s back to his everyday self. I’m so relieved.”

Robert:

“I go to bed with peace of mind and I’m excited about each new day.”

Barbara:

“We both feel like a weight has been lifted.”

Robert:

“KRYSTEXXA is letting me focus on what matters.”

 

HEAR ROBERT TELL BARBARA ABOUT KRYSTEXXA

Barbara:

“How was your visit?”

Robert:

“The doctor said my uric acid level is still high and my oral gout medications aren’t doing enough, which is why I keep having flare-ups. He mentioned that uric acid can build up and cause permanent joint and bone damage.”

Barara:

“So, what now?”

Robert:

“Well, there’s a medication he thinks can help called KRYSTEXXA. It’s an IV treatment I’d get every two weeks for about six months.”

Barbara:

“Six months?”

Robert: “Yeah. He said it’s different than the oral medicine I take and that it could help lower my uric acid level and get rid of the buildup. KRYSTEXXA can get rid of years of gout buildup.”

Barbara:

“Wow. Did you ask about side effects?”

Robert:

“I did. He said KRYSTEXXA could cause an allergic reaction and that he would prescribe medicine to help prevent that. He also told me that the most common side effect of KRYSTEXXA is gout flares during the first three months of treatment because of the drop in uric acid level. He said most people in clinical trials had fewer flares as treatment continued.”

Barbara:

“Sounds promising. If KRYSTEXXA could mean fewer flares later, I’d say go for it.”

Robert:

“Nice touch.”

Barbara:

“We’re both making a lot of progress.”

 

MEET ROBERT’S PATIENT ACCESS LIAISON

Robert:

“Hi Linda.”

Linda:

“Hi Robert. How are you today?”

Robert:

“Everything’s great. Thanks for getting my insurance squared away. I called the infusion center and scheduled my appointments. I’m ready to go.”

Linda:

“Wonderful. Now as I mentioned before, the infusion will take about two hours and you’ll be monitored during and after your infusion for any signs of an allergic reaction.”

Robert:

“I can drive myself home after?”

Linda:

“Absolutely. You may want to bring a blanket to your appointment because infusion centers tend to be a little chilly. I also recommend bringing a water bottle and something to read. You can watch a movie, listen to a podcast. Whatever relaxes you.”

Robert:

“I’ve got a few books lined up.”

Linda:

“Wonderful. I’ll follow up with you after your treatment. Call me if there’s anything you need in the meantime. I’m here for you.”

Robert:

“Will do.”

 

INDICATION AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Narrator:

USE

KRYSTEXXA (pegloticase) is a prescription medicine used in adults to help reduce the signs and symptoms of gout that are not controlled by other treatments.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

What is the most important information I should know about KRYSTEXXA (pegloticase)?

Serious allergic reactions may happen in some patients who receive KRYSTEXXA. These allergic reactions can be life threatening and usually happen within 2 hours of the infusion.

KRYSTEXXA should be given to you by a doctor or nurse in a healthcare setting where serious allergic reactions can be treated. Your doctor or nurse should watch you for any signs of a serious allergic reaction during and after your treatment with KRYSTEXXA.

Tell your doctor or nurse right away if you have any of these symptoms during or after your treatment with KRYSTEXXA:

• Wheezing, shortness of breath, cough. chest tightness. chest pain, or trouble breathing

• Dizziness, fainting, fast or weak heartbeat or feeling nervous

• Reddening of the face, itching, hives, rash, or feeling warm

• Swelling of the throat or tongue, throat tightness, hoarse voice or trouble swallowing

Who should not receive KRYSTEXXA?

Do not receive KRYSTEXXA if you have a rare blood problem called glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency or favism. Your doctor should test you for G6PD before you start KRYSTEXXA.

KRYSTEXXA is not recommended if you have high levels of uric acid without a history of gout.

Before you receive KRYSTEXXA, tell your doctor if you:

Know you have G6PD deficiency

• Ever had any heart problems or high blood pressure

• Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if KRYSTEXXA will harm your unborn baby

• Are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if KRYSTEXXA passes into your breast milk

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take. Do not take any other uric acid lowering drug, such as allopurinol or febuxostat (Uloric©), while taking KRYSTEXXA.

Prior to your treatment with KRYSTEXXA, your doctor may give you medicine to help reduce your chance of getting a reaction. Take these medicines as directed by your doctor or nurse. Your doctor will also test your uric acid levels prior to each treatment to monitor your response to KRYSTEXXA.

What are the possible side effects of KRYSTEXXA?

Please review important information section above. The most common side effects in patients taking KRYSTEXXA were gout flare-ups or attacks, allergic reactions, nausea, bruising, sore throat, constipation, chest pain, and vomiting.

This is not a complete list of all possible side effects. Tell your doctor or treatment team if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Please see the Medication Guide and Prescribing Information for more information. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/safety/medwatch. or call the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

 

 


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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Intended for U.S residents only.

What is the most important information I should know about KRYSTEXXA (pegloticase)?

Serious allergic reactions may happen in some patients who receive KRYSTEXXA. These allergic reactions can be life threatening and usually happen within 2 hours of the infusion.

USE

KRYSTEXXA is a prescription medicine used in adults to help reduce the signs and symptoms of gout that are not controlled by other treatments.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

What is the most important information I should know about KRYSTEXXA (pegloticase)?

Serious allergic reactions may happen in some patients who receive KRYSTEXXA. These allergic reactions can be life threatening and usually happen within 2 hours of the infusion.

KRYSTEXXA should be given to you by a doctor or nurse in a healthcare setting where serious allergic reactions can be treated. Your doctor or nurse should watch you for any signs of a serious allergic reaction during and after your treatment with KRYSTEXXA.

Tell your doctor or nurse right away if you have any of these symptoms during or after your treatment with KRYSTEXXA:

  • Wheezing, shortness of breath, cough, chest tightness, chest pain, or trouble breathing
  • Dizziness, fainting, fast or weak heartbeat or feeling nervous
  • Reddening of the face, itching, hives, rash, or feeling warm
  • Swelling of the throat or tongue, throat tightness, hoarse voice or trouble swallowing

Who should not receive KRYSTEXXA?

Do not receive KRYSTEXXA if you have a rare blood problem called glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency or favism. Your doctor should test you for G6PD before you start KRYSTEXXA.

KRYSTEXXA is not recommended if you have high levels of uric acid without a history of gout.

Before you receive KRYSTEXXA, tell your doctor if you:

  • Know you have G6PD deficiency
  • Ever had any heart problems or high blood pressure
  • Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if KRYSTEXXA will harm your unborn baby
  • Are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if KRYSTEXXA passes into your breast milk

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take. Do not take any other uric acid lowering drug, such as allopurinol or febuxostat (Uloric®), while taking KRYSTEXXA.

Prior to your treatment with KRYSTEXXA, your doctor may give you medicine to help reduce your chance of getting a reaction. Take these medicines as directed by your doctor or nurse. Your doctor will also test your uric acid levels prior to each treatment to monitor your response to KRYSTEXXA.

What are the possible side effects of KRYSTEXXA?

Please review important information section above. The most common side effects in patients taking KRYSTEXXA were gout flare-ups or attacks, allergic reactions, nausea, bruising, sore throat, constipation, chest pain, and vomiting.

This is not a complete list of all possible side effects. Tell your doctor or treatment team if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Please see the Medication Guide and Prescribing Information for more information. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/safety/medwatch, or call the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Intended for U.S residents only.

What is the most important information I should know about KRYSTEXXA (pegloticase)?

Serious allergic reactions may happen in some patients who receive KRYSTEXXA. These allergic reactions can be life threatening and usually happen within 2 hours of the infusion.

USE

KRYSTEXXA is a prescription medicine used in adults to help reduce the signs and symptoms of gout that are not controlled by other treatments.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

What is the most important information I should know about KRYSTEXXA (pegloticase)?

Serious allergic reactions may happen in some patients who receive KRYSTEXXA. These allergic reactions can be life threatening and usually happen within 2 hours of the infusion.

KRYSTEXXA should be given to you by a doctor or nurse in a healthcare setting where serious allergic reactions can be treated. Your doctor or nurse should watch you for any signs of a serious allergic reaction during and after your treatment with KRYSTEXXA.

Tell your doctor or nurse right away if you have any of these symptoms during or after your treatment with KRYSTEXXA:

  • Wheezing, shortness of breath, cough, chest tightness, chest pain, or trouble breathing
  • Dizziness, fainting, fast or weak heartbeat or feeling nervous
  • Reddening of the face, itching, hives, rash, or feeling warm
  • Swelling of the throat or tongue, throat tightness, hoarse voice or trouble swallowing

Who should not receive KRYSTEXXA?

Do not receive KRYSTEXXA if you have a rare blood problem called glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency or favism. Your doctor should test you for G6PD before you start KRYSTEXXA.

KRYSTEXXA is not recommended if you have high levels of uric acid without a history of gout.

Before you receive KRYSTEXXA, tell your doctor if you:

  • Know you have G6PD deficiency
  • Ever had any heart problems or high blood pressure
  • Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if KRYSTEXXA will harm your unborn baby
  • Are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if KRYSTEXXA passes into your breast milk

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take. Do not take any other uric acid lowering drug, such as allopurinol or febuxostat (Uloric®), while taking KRYSTEXXA.

Prior to your treatment with KRYSTEXXA, your doctor may give you medicine to help reduce your chance of getting a reaction. Take these medicines as directed by your doctor or nurse. Your doctor will also test your uric acid levels prior to each treatment to monitor your response to KRYSTEXXA.

What are the possible side effects of KRYSTEXXA?

Please review important information section above. The most common side effects in patients taking KRYSTEXXA were gout flare-ups or attacks, allergic reactions, nausea, bruising, sore throat, constipation, chest pain, and vomiting.

This is not a complete list of all possible side effects. Tell your doctor or treatment team if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Please see the Medication Guide and Prescribing Information for more information. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/safety/medwatch, or call the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.